I'VE HEARD! The FOM Ohana Luau at the Lake Provides GREAT Scholarships For Easter Island Students!

Link: http://www.fraternalorderofmoai.org/ohana/

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

The rumblings have been present all week! With an ear to the ground - I've Heard that the Ohana Luau at the Lake event put on by the FOM has provided a lot of scholarship money for students living on Easter Island! We asked Princess Pupule of the FOM (and one of the main fellows behind the event) to give us all some details on what was accomplished this year and some background on what we have done in the past.

For people not familiar with Ohana Luau at the Lake, please give a quick overview of the event and it’s ‘Fun With A Purpose’ charity goals.
(PP): Ohana Luau at the Lake is an awesome Tiki weekend event held at the Tiki Resort, a 1950’s throwback located in the town of Lake George, New York. (“Ohana” is an Hawaiian culture word for ‘family’, in an extended sense of the term). Ohana Luau at the Lake is an exciting weekend of fun, live music, cocktails, shopping and camaraderie with the Ohana, during a weekend that many look forward to all year long. AND - if it isn’t enough to have an AWESOME Tiki weekend – the event is done to raise money for The Fraternal Order of Moai’s charity of choice: The Easter Island Foundation, a 501c(3). A majority of the funds raised are being used to fund scholarships for people from Easter Island, with the remaining funds used to support other programs that enrich the island and the people who live there.

I believe Ohana Luau at the Lake is coming up on its 10th year, how many students from Easter Island have we been able to help over the previous 9 years with the event proceeds?
(PP): Over the last 10 years, the Ohana event has helped 25 students with defraying some of the cost of their higher education endeavors, through the FOM donations toward scholarships. The Toki Music School & the Terevaka Archeology program also benefit from funds raised through the Ohana event. The goal of the FOM’s sponsorship is to help those students who want to bring their skills back to the island, in order to help their community grow and prosper. Our scholarship recipients have attended college for higher learning in various fields, from medicine to archeology to hospitality and many other fields of study – all valuable skills that can be utilized on the island of Rapa Nui.

What was the total amount to the charity we were able to provide this year? How is that compared to last year?
(PP): For the 2017 Ohana we were able to donate $19,500 to the Easter Island Foundation. This amount is an increase compared with last year’s total of $17,000.00, so you can see that our attendees have their hearts in the right place when it comes to raising the bar for our yearly goals. As a matter of fact - Ohana has been fortunate enough to be able to increase our donation to the EIF every year, not only increasing the number of scholarships we are able to provide each year, but also giving us the ability to increase our support of other island programs. This is what our Order means when they say ‘Fun With A Purpose’.

What kind of future do you see for the event? As it grows in size and desirability as a destination event, are there any plans to expand the event to accommodate that growth?
(PP): Look, it’s a wild and fun event, you just never know what wacky, crazy stuff we might come up with in the future! We’re always looking to tweak the experience to make it better for the attendees, the sponsors and the hosts. We really do listen to the suggestions we get, and if something seems like a good change that keeps with the spirit of the event (while keeping the stuff that ‘Ohanaites’ love about the event, of course!) then we’ll do it! Finally, you know you can always count on the kick-off party being wacky & weird – an event worth the price of admission alone!
Now on to the question regarding expanding the event. We sell out Ohana every year, and while we have gradually allowed attendance numbers to rise a bit, it is by design that we will never let Ohana be too big – it’s all about the Ohana – all about the connection that our attendees feel with each other. It’s an event where new friends are made and old friendships renewed and it has been and always will be about the spirit of Ohana. The bigger the event gets, the greater risk there is of losing the spirit of what the Ohana is all about. That’s why the intention is to always stay the ‘right size’ event in order to stay true to its original intentions and purpose.


If money was no object, what one thing would you like to see become part of future Ohana Luau At The Lake event?
(PP): Something fun and bizarre, like an airplane dropping Tikis from the sky all over the resort. You know, a sunny afternoon poolside, the band is playing, the bartenders are busy and suddenly overhead the sound of a plane flying close overhead. That’s when the planes start dropping the Tikis. Free air dropped Tikis for everyone dropped over The Tiki Resort! A Tikiphiles dream come true! Unless of course it turns out like WKRPs Famous Turkey Drop…
OK, OK, a little closer to the here and now. Bigger, crazier and more awesome bands, of course! Some cool, never-seen-before Ohana swag to remember the weekend by and maybe some robots to run the whole damn thing so that Sully and I can sit round with a Mai Tai in our hands and just tell all of the mechanical robots what to do!
But seriously, we’ve got some great stuff in the works on that front for Ohana 10…SO STAY TUNED!!!


Many thanks to Princess Pupule for this overview of Ohana and it's charitable function! One thing you can be sure of - if she says the 10th Ohana Luau At The Lake is going to be great - you can bet on it! Hope we get to see all of you there, but make your plans now because it ALWAYS sells out! You can check out all of the 2018 Ohana Luau At The Lake action by clicking on the link at the top of this page!









F.O.M. sends annual donation to the Easter Island Foundation

Iorana!

We are very pleased to announce that after closing the books for Ohana: Luau at the Lake 2017 and Chicago Area Tiki Tour 3 the Fraternal Order of Moai Foundation, a charitable 501(c)(3) organization, has donated $19,500 to the Easter Island Foundation to support scholarships for youth from the island of Rapa Nui, the Foundation’s general fund, music education on Rapa Nui, and archeological outreach.

The Easter Island Foundation, a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization founded in 1989, was named by the Moai as our national charity in 2008.

Funds for this gift, including a portion of general event proceeds and silent auction/mystery bowl auction donations, were raised at Ohana: Luau at the Lake in Lake George, New York, and the Chicago Area Tiki Tour. Thanks to the generous support of our sponsors, donors, performers, and attendees, everyone had “fun with a purpose” while raising money for these important scholarships and the foundation that distributes them.

This gift to the Easter Island Foundation has been split into four parts.

First, $13,000 will be donated to support several scholarships, which will be awarded to Rapa Nui students for use in paying college expenses. Preference will be given to those students who intend to return with skills which will benefit the Rapa Nui people and island upon graduation. More information about scholarship recipients will be announced once the Easter Island Foundation scholarship committee awards these funds.

Funds from the Chicago Area Tiki Tour, organized by the Red Palms Chapter of the Fraternal Order of Moai, will continue funding for the “Fraternal Order of Moai Roger Carlson Scholarship."

This adds to $52,525 in previous Easter Island Foundation scholarship awards funded by the Fraternal Order of Moai.

In addition to the scholarship fund donation, $3,000 will be donated to the Easter Island Foundation's general fund to support the other work of the foundation which includes promoting conservation and protection of the fragile cultural heritage of Easter Island and other Polynesian islands. Among its many projects, the Foundation established the William Mulloy Library on the island; funds archaeological research; publishes a series of books about Easter Island and Polynesia; publishes Rapa Nui Journal; and sponsors conferences about Easter Island and Polynesia.

We have also donated $1,500 to be used to support Toki Rapa Nui Music School which provides free music education to children on the island.

An additional $1,500 to be used to support the Terevaka Archaeological Outreach program.

The fun will continue in the coming year. Plans for the tenth annual Ohana: Luau at the Lake in June 2018 are rolling along. We are also excited at the prospect of growing our charitable support for the Easter Island Foundation and other worthy causes.

Come join the Moai and experience "fun with a purpose" for yourself. Find more information online at facebook.com/TheMoai and @TheMoai.

Keep the torches burning,

—Tagata Maori Rogorogo

I've Heard: From Jeff 'Beachbum' Berry!

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

In our never-ending search for all the Tiki news that fits (“If it fits – we’ll print it!”), we reached out to the Big Daddy of today’s Tiki Torch Bearers (TTBs) – someone who is a driving force in bringing more and more of the Tiki lifestyle to the hungry masses: Jeff 'Beachbum' Berry! Jeff graciously agreed to a FOM interview and we are happy to present that to you now. Be sure take a few minutes and meet another TTB who is creating the vibe we all enjoy so much!.

Please give our readers a quick background on yourself
(BBB): Beginning in 1994, I published a series of books about the long-lost recipes of the American tiki drink's golden age, which lasted from the Depression to the Disco era. Many of these recipes were closely guarded trade secrets that had never before been published. After tracking these recipes down, I often had to "decode" them, as they were written in a number code to stop rival tiki bartenders from stealing them.

These books — and eventually my iPhone drink app “Total Tiki,” co-created with Martin Doudoroff — revealed the "lost" secret recipes that are now served in neo-Tiki bars around the world, including the Jet Pilot, Saturn, Three Dots & A Dash, and the original 1934 Zombie. Along the way, David Wondrich in Esquire magazine dubbed me “one of the instigators of the cocktail revolution,” Food & Wine called me “one of the world’s leading rum experts,” and the New York Times said I was “the Indiana Jones of Tiki drinks.”

As the 21st century Tiki Revival grew, it became time to stop writing about drinks and start serving them. So my wife Mrs. Bum (alias Annene Kaye) and I opened Beachbum Berry's Latitude 29 in late 2014, in the heart of the French Quarter of New Orleans.

I’ve also co-created a line of Tiki barware with Cocktail Kingdom, and co-created a retail line of falernum and orgeat syrups with Adam Kolesar of Orgeat Works.


What was the first time you encountered Tiki/Polynesian Pop culture and what did you think about the experience?
BBB): As a six-year-old taken to Polynesian restaurants in the 1960s, I watched grown-ups ordering these amazing-looking exotic cocktails served with ice cones molded around straws, fancifully garnished with flaming lime shells. But by the time I was old enough to order one, it was the 1980s and all the places that served them were disappearing. So I looked into how to make them myself.

I originally started in libraries, looking up old magazines, and in used book stores, searching for old recipe books. I also scoured swap meets and paper ephemera shows for old Polynesian restaurant menus. Aside from the Trader Vic books (which spilled many but not all of his secrets), I didn't learn much this way. Because the original restaurants were so profitable -- and what drove the profits were the drinks -- that they kept the recipes secret. They wouldn't publish them, so people couldn’t make them at home.

The other reason recipes weren't written down was that the big restaurant owners, like Don the Beachcomber, didn't want their competitors to get them. The people he hired to tend bar knew only that a recipe called for a half ounce of "spice number two" or a dash of "syrup number four"—that's how the bottles were labeled. So if a rival restaurateur hired away one of Donn’s barmen, that barman still wouldn’t know what was in Donn’s recipes.

Eventually, after I published my first book, I persuaded some of these old guys to open up, and eventually I got their little black recipe books. But even there they were in code. It wasn't enough to get the books; I still couldn't make the drinks. I had to crack the code, by combining evidence with guesswork and experimentation -- which in some cases took several years. Tracking down and decoding these vintage recipes involved a lot of time and effort. So whenever I discovered a “lost” drink that wasn’t satisfying, but had the potential to be, I hated just to file it and move on. Instead, I sometimes spent weeks adapting and tweaking such drinks into something worth printing. Without even being aware of it, I was home-schooling myself in the building blocks of exotic drinkery. Eventually I started making drinks from scratch.


How do you see yourself and your role in the current Tiki revival?
(BBB): I’m not one to toot my own conch shell, so I’ll let Robert Simonson of the New York Times do it: “Without Jeff Berry’s diligence in tracking down barkeeps from Trader Vic’s and Don the Beachcomber and prying from them the drink recipes secreted in their brains, the tiki revival that began in the late 2000s simply wouldn’t have occurred.”

And here’s M. Carrie Allen, writing in The Washington Post: “If you’ve had a good tiki drink, one that layered rums in a way that really worked, that contained flavors you couldn’t quite put your finger on, you were probably an unknowing beneficiary of Berry’s work.”


What do you know about the Fraternal Order of Moai and its mission?
(BBB): I know that some of my best friends are members (aloha, Joe & Nicole Desmond!) and that FOM does fine charitable work for Pacific Islanders.

What do you see for the future of the Tiki/Polynesian Pop movement?
(BBB): I can’t speak for the future of the movement writ large, but my future is Tiki till the end of time — well, anyway, till the end of my time. Specifically, at Beachbum Berry’s Latitude 29, which is my forever home, and the place that makes me happiest.

Please tell us about any upcoming projects that you might have in the works
(BBB): I just finished putting together a deluxe 10-Year anniversary edition of “Sippin’ Safari.” This edition will feature a new “afterward” taking readers through the ten years after “Sippin’” first appeared: the explosive tiki cocktail revolution that no-one saw coming in 2007, which was aided and abetted by the craft cocktail renaissance that grew on parallel tracks, ending with the opening of amazing new tiki cocktail bars around the world.

There will also be 14 additional, previously unpublished vintage Tiki drink recipes. And 10 new recipes from the Tiki Revival around the world.

Cocktail Kingdom will publish the book in a hardcover edition, we hope by late October or early November.


And now for a question of Supreme Importance to the Fellows of FOM: What are some of the possible reasons that clowns inspire a ‘fight or flight’ mechanism in some FOM members?
(BBB): Their greasepaint recalls horrific memories of encountering Tikis painted bright red and green at restaurants that used to be Tiki bars.

Thank you Jeff 'Beachbum' Berry for a great interview and for your support of the Fraternal Order of Moai - we look forward to all new projects and adventures of yours!

I'VE HEARD! That The Kon-Tiki Chapter Fellows Will Be Getting Free Cocktails Very Soon!

Link: http://www.fraternalorderofmoai.org/news/index.php

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
I've Heard that the Kon-Tiki Chapter of the FOM now has an official Kon-Tiki Chapter Challenge Coin! If that thing gets slapped down on the bar next to you 'Fellow FOM Types' - and you don't have a Challenge Coin to respond with? Oooohhhhh - I'd make sure you carry a lot of cash with you - it could get ugly. To spare yourself the pain of buying cocktails for Kon-Tikis all night (the Kon-Tikis will not notice your suffering - they will be too busy ingesting that free cocktail!) - I might suggest that you check in with the Kon-Tiki folks and they might be able to tell you how your chapter can get a Chapter Challenge Coin too. But wait a bit if you will please - they would like a few free cocktails on your dime first!
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

I've Heard...From Ed Rudisell!

Link: https://www.facebook.com/edrudisell

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
In our never-ending search for all the Tiki news that fits (“If it fits – we’ll print it!”), we reached out to another one of today’s Tiki Torch Bearers (TTBs) – someone who is a driving force in bringing more and more of the Tiki lifestyle to the hungry masses: Ed Rudisell! Ed has been in the food and beverage industry for many, many years and is well known among Indiana Tiki-philes. Ed has some great and exciting news to send out in his interview below, so take a few minutes and meet another TTB who is creating the vibe we all enjoy so much!.

Please give our readers a quick background on yourself.
(ER):I'm a restaurateur in Indianapolis. I've been in the industry my whole working life, but didn't really take it seriously as a career choice until I was nearly 30. My wife and I opened a Thai restaurant in the Fountain Square neighborhood in Indianapolis in the Fall of 2008 and have since opened 3 more places and stay involved in a variety of projects. I also co-host a food + drink podcast called Shift Drink Podcast (shiftdrinkpodcast.com). That's just a fun project for myself and my co-host. We don't make money from it, but it's a great excuse to meet interesting people from all over the world.

What was the first time you encountered Tiki/Polynesian Pop culture?
(ER): The earliest I can remember would be from visiting the local, old school Chinese joint not far from where I grew up on the southside of Indianapolis. They're still open and still have the classic menus (though quite faded now), Koi pond, Tiki mugs, and Pu Pu Platters! (Editor's Note - this would be the fabulous Lotus Garden in Greenwood, Indiana!) Though that's probably the first time I encountered a slice of it, rum is what re-introduced me as an adult. One of our places, Black Market, has over 125 rums available on the shelf. Years ago we started off with a small collection and not much knowledge about rum but I now hunt down esoteric and rare bottlings wherever I am. I have a particular obsession with earthy rhum agricole and funky, Jamaican pot still rums. The rum and Tiki worlds overlap quite a bit, so my love of rum lead me back to Tiki.

Why do you think Tiki/Polynesian Pop culture continues to be popular?
(ER): It's timeless. For the general population, I think the escapism aspect is definitely a draw. As trends ebb and flow, I think people always are looking for that escape. As everyone soon finds out, the rabbit hole goes deep. Once you have that first properly-made Mai Tai, it's just a matter of time before the rest grabs a hold of you.

What do you know about the Fraternal Order of Moai?
(ER): I found about about the Fraternal Order of Moai through my friendship with Rev_Dan in Indianapolis. I've known him since high school and we re-connected through our love of cocktails and rum. We get together every so often and talk rum, Tiki, and travel. He's got a great bar in his basement called Blue Demon's Hideaway. When I'm there, we're usually making some stiff drinks with the every-so-funky Rum Fire from Hampden Estate in Jamaica. I occasionally post in the Port about rum though I'm not very good about staying active there with my busy restaurant life. I also particularly love the work that the FOM does with the Easter Island Foundation. It's great that Tiki people band together to not only enjoy each others' company but also to help people in the islands.

Tell us about your upcoming project.
(ER): The General Manager at Black Market and I recently decided to take our rum and Tiki interests and 'spin it off' from Black Market and open a Tiki bar ourselves. We are working closely with Dave Hansen of Lake Tiki on the design and plan to bring a fun and unique place to the city. We wanted to represent the Midwest well. We love the work of the coastal guys, but wanted to pay homage to the Midwest's place in Tiki history. After all, Stephen Crane was from Indiana. I don't want to give away anything too early (we won't be open until toward the end of this year) but the layout of the building - which used to be a courtroom - gives us some interesting design opportunities that larger markets like Chicago rarely get. We're leaning on some of the darker aspects of the culture - headhunters, cannibals, skulls, and PNG tribal art. The research has been a lot of fun. The logistics not so much. Ha!

What do you see for the future of the Tiki/Polynesian Pop movement?
(ER): I think it's full steam ahead. As events like Ohana Luau At The Lake, Tiki Oasis, Hukilau, Tiki Kon, and the like get bigger and bigger every year, it's coming back into the forefront of public consciousness. I have a lot of employees that are considered millennials and they're getting interested. Everything ebbs and flows. I know not everyone is going to get fully immersed in the culture, but I think bartenders and bar owners are starting to learn more about Tiki culture rather than just have a passing interest in the cocktails. Right now Tiki cocktails are trendy and I, for one, am ecstatic about that. I've heard a lot of Tikiphiles get upset that most bartenders don't understand the provenance of the drinks and therefore shouldn't be serving them, but a lot of people initially come to Tiki through the cocktails and rum. This era is going to ignite passion in a lot of people. The bars that are just interested for the sake of trendiness will move on to something else when the next hot thing comes along. But, in their wake will be a lot of bartenders and customers that got their first taste of Tiki during this current wave of excitement. When you ask "when was the first time you encountered Tiki culture" to someone 20 years from now, they're going to answer, "back around 2017".

And now for a question of Supreme Importance to the Fellows of FOM: If there is such a thing as reincarnation – what do goats come back as?
(ER): Our Overlords...

REMINDER! The Hula Hop In Columbus Ohio Is Fast Approaching - Are YOU Gonna Be There??? (Saturday August 12, 2017)

Link: http://www.hulahopcolumbus.com/

For the past few years the Kahiki Chapter of the Fraternal Order of Moai has had the honor and privilege to host the Hot Rod Hula Hop. The event has always delivered on its promise of a good time for a good cause. This year the Kahiki Chapter Fellows are shaking things up a bit. While we have always loved classic cars and bowling, we are going to focus on the Tiki aspect of the event this year and therefore, we proudly present THE HULA HOP!

THE HULA HOP is a one day Polynesian pop, Tiki themed street festival to be held in downtown Columbus, Ohio on Grant Ave. (“Home of the Grass Skirt Tiki Room”) between Gay St. and Long St. The festival kicks off at noon Saturday, August 12th with vendors, food trucks, and bands. The musical entertainment this year is outta sight! This year the Hula Hop presents Francis Lacuna, Apocalypso, The Hellroys, Mummula, Superfez!, and The Darts.

Come on down, sip on a tropical cocktail and enjoy the bands performing on an open air stage. Take off your shoes and relax on our downtown luau sand beach. Peruse the dozens of vendors that will be on hand. Visit with George, the legendary fountain that once greeted guests at the Kahiki Supper Club. There is more, so much more to announce , so stay tuned and check in to www.hulahopcolumbus.com and check us out on Facebook.

Want to be a Vendor at the Hula Hop?

Thinking about being a Sponsor for the Hula Hop?

The Hula Hop is now accepting vendors and sponsors. If you, or someone you know would like to be a vendor or be a sponsor shoot us an email at [email protected]

I've Heard.......From Martin Cate!!!

Link: http://www.fraternalorderofmoai.org/news/index.php

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
In our never-ending search for all the Tiki news that fits (“If it fits – we’ll print it!”), we reached out to one of today’s Tiki Torch Bearers (TTBs) – someone who is a driving force in bringing more and more of the Tiki lifestyle to the hungry masses: Martin Cate! Martin owns Smuggler’s Cove in San Francisco – named one of the 50 Greatest Bars on Earth by the Times of London 6 years running, Best American Cocktail Bar in 2016 at the annual Tales of The Cocktail Spirited Awards, and many, many other awards and industry recognitions. In addition, he is the co-owner of Hale Pele in Portland, Oregon, the False Idol in San Diego and a partner at Lost Lake in Chicago. His 2016 book “Smuggler’s Cove: Exotic Cocktails, Rum and the Cult of Tiki” was recently named the 2017 James Beard Media Award for Best Beverage Book. So, let’s face it – the guy is a busy man! That’s why we are so pleased that he was willing to take a few minutes to answer some questions about him, his background, and of course – a very important FOM question. Enjoy!

What is your fondest memory of US popular culture as you were growing up?
(MC): I had a handful of Tiki experiences as a kid, one of which really stuck with me as my first exposure to “dining as experience”. But I suppose like most 70s kids, Star Wars was probably my fondest US pop culture memory.

What was it about Tiki and Polynesian Pop culture that attracted you to it?
(MC): I was entranced by the artwork and the immersive environments. The overall sensation of being in a great Tiki bar- of it being both an escape but also cozy and sheltering. A sense of protection from some imaginary storm, with a comforting cocktail in hand.

How does it feel to have become a ‘celebrity’ around the Tiki / Polynesian Pop / Cocktail culture? Has it changed your life in any way?
(MC): Well, I certainly consider myself very fortunate to have been able to make my passion my profession. I love being able to share my thoughts on rum and exotic cocktails with people at events around the world. I’m grateful that I’ve been able to use my success to further my education at distilleries throughout the Caribbean, and Rebecca and I were both incredibly flattered by all the Tiki people who came to see us on our book tour. (and getting to do a book tour that went to Tiki bars was as good as it sounds!!)

When did you hear about the Fraternal Order of Moai and how do you feel about their charitable work?
(MC): Seems like I remember when the FOM was just getting started and I met a few early members. It’s amazing how much it’s grown, and the scholarship for students from Rapa Nui is a really smart and creative way to give back.

What do see as the future for the interest in Tiki and Polynesian Pop culture – a ‘fad’ that will peak and fade (again), or a trend that will continue to grow in interest and participation?
(MC): I don’t think it will ever be as big as it was in the heyday- there are just too many other entertainment options and diverse interests today. But I like to think that Tiki bars are making a small but welcome comeback to the American landscape, and I’m happy to see more people building their own backyard paradises as well. Life in 2017 certainly demands that you unplug and take some away from it!

Any new plans that you might want to give us a hint about, regarding you and your work?
(MC): Nothing set in stone. Been working on steady improvements on the Cove all year, including much needed additional seating. And we’re coming up on the 5th Anniversary of Hale Pele, so we’ve just launched a new logo and we’ll be pouring a bunch of new décor into the space over the next few months. Yep, a Tiki bar getting more Tiki- isn’t that nice to hear for a change?

And Most Importantly: Pie or No Pie?
(MC): Always pie. Dutch Apple Pie with the streusel topping. Oh yeah.

I've Heard!!! The FOM Continues To Grow!!!

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
I've Heard about a map that shows the states and countries of people who have attended all of the Ohanas over the years! Dig it - the FOM continues to move towards GTI (Global Tiki Influence)!  Mahalo to all Fellows who work so hard to bring the the FOM message to the world: Fun With A Purpose!
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

OHANA AT THE LAKE! SILENT AUCTION! GET INVOLVED!!!

Link: http://www.fraternalorderofmoai.org/ohana/silentauction.php

It's Coming! Only 1 day until Ohana at the Lake kicks off (June 22-24)! Yeah - there is going to be a lot of fun! Yeah - there is going to be a lot of music! Yeah - there is going to be a lot of Tiki vendors! Yeah - there might even be a few adult beverages (ahem). You know what else there is going to be a lot of? No? Well here's how you can find out, and make Ohana at the Lake an even bigger success than in years past: Donate to The Silent Auction! The Silent Auction at Ohana at the Lake raises money for our organization's primary charity, The Easter Island Foundation Scholarships http://islandheritage.org/wordpress. The FOM Foundation turns the proceeds of the auction over to The Easter Island Foundation after the event, and can raise as much as $6000.00 for scholarships to kids living on the Islands

To donate to the Ohana at the Lake Silent Auction prior to the event you can go to the website http://www.fraternalorderofmoai.org/ohana/silentauction.php. There we will ask you for an image of the item (doesn’t have to be some fancy Ansel Adams type picture just as long as we can tell what it is), and a description of the item. With that information, we can post the items onto the Silent Auction website. We will also get your name and contact information so that a receipt can be provided to you for tax deduction purposes if that is applicable to you – these are sent out with thank you notes after the event ends. All kinds of items can be donated (art, kitschy things, Tiki items, cocktail tools - hell we will take most anything if it raises a few bucks!)! It helps if you get to us at least week before the event so that we can do all the prep work to get things ready for the auction, but we will also take items at the event because: It’s For The Kids! If you are bringing the items with you, they can be dropped off when you pick up your badge and swag bag. If you are flying in and need to ship the item in advance – indicate that when you go to the website above and you will be given instructions on how to do that.

So dig through that attic, dig through those drawers (Really? C’mon - you know what kind of drawers I mean!), look on your shelves and see what you can donate to help The FOM raise money for scholarships. You’ll feel good about it – trust me. Just Do It!

I'VE HEARD: Somebody On The Internet Is Talking About The FOM!

Link: http://bit.ly/2r4JHal

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
I just heard about a blog posting that tells all about The Fraternal Order Of Moai, on tikiwithray.com. Click the link at the top of this article to read it - it's a great history reminder for all Fellows, and a solid introduction to the organization for those on the Tiki path!  ALOHA!

I've Heard!

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

ATTENTION Fraternal Order of Moai Fellows and all tiki bliss seekers! I'VE HEARD there are some exciting things coming to the FOM blog, make sure you check in often to see what's up! 

I'VE HEARD it's going to be entertaining and informative:  

2017 Hula Hop Is Coming!

Link: http://www.hulahopcolumbus.com/

For the past few years the Kahiki Chapter of the Fraternal Order of Moai has had the honor and privilege to host the Hot Rod Hula Hop. The event has always delivered on its promise of a good time for a good cause. This year the Kahiki Chapter Fellows are shaking things up a bit. While we have always loved classic cars and bowling, we are going to focus on the Tiki aspect of the event this year and therefore, we proudly present THE HULA HOP!

THE HULA HOP is a one day Polynesian pop, Tiki themed street festival to be held in downtown Columbus, Ohio on Grant Ave. (“Home of the Grass Skirt Tiki Room”) between Gay St. and Long St. The festival kicks off at noon with vendors, food trucks, and bands. The musical entertainment this year is outta sight! This year the Hula Hop presents Francis LLacuna, Apocalypso, The Hellroys, Mummula, Superfez!, and The Darts.

Come on down, sip on a tropical cocktail and enjoy the bands performing on an open air stage. Take off your shoes and relax on our downtown luau sand beach. Peruse the dozens of vendors that will be on hand. Visit with George, the legendary fountain that once greeted guests at the Kahiki Supper Club. There is more, so much more to announce , so stay tuned and check in to www.hulahopcolumbus.com and check us out on Facebook.

Want to be a Vendor at the Hula Hop?

Thinking about being a Sponsor for the Hula Hop?

The Hula Hop is now accepting vendors and sponsors. If you, or someone you know would like to be a vendor or be a sponsor shoot us an email at [email protected]

F.O.M. 2017 Scholarships Awarded by the Easter Island Foundation

Iorana,

The Easter Island Foundation has announced the annual awarding of the 2017 Fraternal Order of Moai scholarships to six students of Rapa Nui ancestry. These scholarships were funded by money raised at Ohana Luau by the Lake in Lake George, New York; Ohana Luau by the Sea in Fort Lauderdale, Florida; and the Tour de FOM bike trip.

The Scholarship winners are:

Emilou Vaeari Benitez Tepano; Public relations/Marketing - Fraternal Order of Moai Ohana Scholarship ($2000)

"I will go back to the island and create my own small communications company, that will be the first one on the island. I consider that this could help the Rapanui people in different ways. Communication is a powerful tool in different aspects or expressions; it’s so powerful that it could influence or change the ways people behave or even how they think or act. The island needs important changes, especially in the social aspect. Public Relations is a profession that for many years has influenced the way we relate with to big business, brands and organizations, that is why I would like to focus my career on culture and sports, where the people of the island have a lot of potential."





Marari Taura‘a Riroroko Cabezas; Agronomy - Fraternal Order of Moai Tangata Manu Scholarship ($2000)

"One of my projects in the future is to correct the problem with untreated water on Rapa Nui. I would like to implement a system where wastewater s treated for the whole community and used as irrigation water for fertilization and crops. My greatest desire is to combat erosion, which increases every day due to rain, winds and excessive traffic of animals and humans. In the past year, I learned about useful and beneficial tools that could be applied on Rapa Nui, such as innovative irrigations systems that collect water from rain for use on crops and the recognition of fungal diseases present in crops and their control and prevention. These tools that have given me the knowledge that I can use in the future for the betterment of our everyday lives on Rapa Nui."

Maeha Vaiora León Duran; Fashion design/Industrial Process Laboratory - Fraternal Order of Moai S– holarship ($2000)

"I want to return to Rapa Nui to carry out workshops to teach the care and way of using Rapanui materials such as mahute, kakaka and seashells (pipi, pure, etc.). The workshops will consist of teaching basic skills to take measurements, make molds, and the use of different machines to begin to develop small companies and organize ideas to create a collection. The aim is to save and preserve ancestral clothing and to improve the quality and preparation of garments to be used in parades and cultural festivals."





Tipanie Blanco Velásquez; Medicine - Fraternal Order of Moai Scholarship ($2000)

"Once I finish my studies, I will work first on the continent (Chile), to gain more experience as a doctor. In addition, I want to provide for support and guidance to all the Rapanui people who must go the continent for medical reasons, because few people on the continent fully inform the Rapanui people of the medical procedures and administrative steps they must take. Afterwards, I will return to the island to offer my professional services to the Rapanui community. With more experience and belonging to the Rapa Nui culture, I will be able to provide good quality service as a doctor, not only professionally but also as a protector of Rapanui culture, knowing the needs of the people of the island. I would like to do projects, together with other health professionals, to give the Rapanui people full and quality care, so that the smallest number of people on the island have to travel to the continent to go to the doctor."

Américo Loyola Edmunds; Agronomy; Roger Danger Carlson Award ($1,525)

"After completing the program in Engineering in Agriculture, I am currently taking a course on the installation of photovoltaic solar panels. I would like to be able to create a sustainable project for agriculture on Rapa Nui based on renewable energy emitted by the solar panels. The possibility of continuing my studies for a year and a half more to get a degree to Agronomy motivates and encourages me, and as I acquire more knowledge and experience, both practical and theoretical, I can later teach classes at the Agricultural School "Aldea Educativa" on the island to the future generations."





Oscar Pakomio Jara; Physical Education and Health - Fraternal Order of Moai Scholarship ($2000)

"During this year I carried out my professional practice and my thesis which was based on a comparative study between the level of active displacement between the students of the continent and Rapa Nui. This motivated me to continue investigating and carrying out studies in the Rapa Nui village, since, very few studies exist on the island, in terms of living habits, daily habits, etc., especially in the field of health. Only by enhancing the study and research of our island in various subjects, we can improve our quality of life on the island, which is a task in which everyone can and should participate. This is one of the reasons that motivates me to continue studying and improving in my area of expertise, deepening my knowledge and acquiring greater tools to improve the life and prestige of my beloved island."


The 2017 Ohana Luau by the Lake is fast approaching! Proceeds from both of these events will help fund scholarships in 2018. Join the Moai at our events and experience a special brand of "fun with a purpose."

Please visit http://www.fraternalorderofmoai.org/ for more information about our events.

Keep the Torches Burning,

-Tagata Maori Rogorogo

F.O.M. sends annual donation to the Easter Island Foundation

Iorana!

We are very pleased to announce that after closing the books for Ohana: Luau at the Lake 2016, Ohana: Luau by the Sea 2016, and the inaugural "Tour de FOM" bike trip, the Fraternal Order of Moai Foundation, a charitable 501(c)(3) organization, has donated $17,025 to the Easter Island Foundation to support scholarships for youth from the island of Rapa Nui, the Foundation’s general fund, music education on Rapa Nui, and archeological outreach.

The Easter Island Foundation, a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization founded in 1989, was named by the Moai as our national charity in 2008.

Funds for this gift, including a portion of general event proceeds and silent auction/mystery bowl auction donations, were raised at Ohana: Luau at the Lake in Lake George, New York, Ohana: Luau by the Sea in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, and along the Katy Trail in Missouri. Thanks to the generous support of our sponsors, donors, performers, and attendees, everyone had “fun with a purpose” while raising money for these important scholarships and the foundation that distributes them.

This gift to the Easter Island Foundation has been split into four parts.

First, $10,000 will be donated to support several scholarships, which will be awarded to Rapa Nui students for use in paying college expenses. Preference will be given to those students who intend to return with skills which will benefit the Rapa Nui people and island upon graduation. More information about scholarship recipients will be announced once the Easter Island Foundation scholarship committee awards these funds.

In addition to the scholarship fund donation, $2,500 will be donated to the Easter Island Foundation's general fund to support the other work of the foundation which includes promoting conservation and protection of the fragile cultural heritage of Easter Island and other Polynesian islands. Among its many projects, the Foundation established the William Mulloy Library on the island; funds archaeological research; publishes a series of books about Easter Island and Polynesia; publishes Rapa Nui Journal; and sponsors conferences about Easter Island and Polynesia.

We have also donated $1,500 to be used to support Toki Rapa Nui Music School which provides free music education to children on the island.

An additional $1,500 to be used to support the Terevaka Archaeological Outreach program.

And finally earlier this year members of the the Red Palms Chapter of the Fraternal Order of Moai organized the Tour de FOM along the Katy Trail and raised an additional $1,525 for the Easter Island Foundation to continue funding for the “Fraternal Order of Moai Roger Carlson Scholarship."

The fun will continue in the coming year. Plans for Ohana: Luau at the Lake 2017 in June and the return of the Chicago Area Tiki Tour are rolling along. We are also excited at the prospect of growing our charitable support for the Easter Island Foundation and other worthy causes.

Come join the Moai and experience "fun with a purpose" for yourself. Find more information online at facebook.com/TheMoai and @TheMoai.

Keep the torches burning,

—Tagata Maori Rogorogo

And the CATT came back

Aloha!

The Chicago Area Tiki Tour returns for a third life in 2017!

Follow them on Facebook for all the latest news about event plans and ticket sales.

Keep the Torches Burning,

—Tagata Maori Rogorogo

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